• Keeping Your Cat Healthy and Happy When Moving to a New Home

    Cats are highly territorial creatures , and they don’t enjoy major changes in their routine or environment. Because of these characteristics, moving to a new home with a kitty can be particularly challenging. Ahead of the move, take your cat to a veterinarian in San Jose for a wellness exam. Your vet can recommend strategies to keep him or her as calm as possible. For very high-strung cats, a mild sedative may be appropriate. cat - moving

    Before the Move

    Your kitty may be distressed at the sight of moving boxes scattered throughout the home. Consider closing off one room for packing and storing boxes ahead of your moving day. Assess the size of your cat carrier. If you’ll be moving several hours away or farther, you might need a larger carrier to help your cat stay comfortable in transit. Additionally, you could ask your vet to microchip your cat, just in case.

    During the Move

    On moving day, secure your cat inside one room with food, water, and a litter box. Put a note on the door instructing family members and professional movers not to open the door. This not only minimizes the stress to your kitty, but also eliminates the possibility of your cat escaping outdoors and fleeing the chaos. Be sure to check on your furry friend frequently, and offer lots of reassurance. It might be tempting to dole out lots of treats, but feeding your cat lightly on moving day is preferable. It minimizes the risk of an upset stomach. When everything is packed up, put an old sweater that has familiar smells in the cat’s carrier. Coax your cat inside, and do not open the door while in transit—a frightened cat can escape and run away.

    While Settling In

    Upon arrival at your new home, unload the cat carrier first. Place your cat in a closed-off room with food, water, and the litter box. Keep the carrier in the room, in case your cat wants to hide in there for a while. Veterinarians recommend keeping your cat in a closed-off room for a few days to let him or her get accustomed to the new home. Outdoor cats should stay inside the house for at least two weeks.

  • Spotlight on Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

    Feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) occurs when the cat’s bladder cannot evacuate urine. The urine backs up and causes discomfort. FLUTD can be fatal if a veterinarian doesn’t treat it promptly. Cat parents in the San Jose area should know how to recognize the signs of FLUTD to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. When you watch this video, you’ll learn that FLUTD is typically indicated by little to no urine production, loss of appetite, vomiting, and more frequent, yet unproductive visits to the litter box.

    The veterinarian in this video explains how your vet can diagnose FLUTD. To treat it, the vet can sedate your kitty and place a urinary catheter to drain the urine. Cats with FLUTD will typically need fluids, and possibly antibiotics and a change in diet. Younger male cats are more likely to get FLUTD, especially if they are overweight.

  • Is My Guinea Pig Sick?

    In the wild, guinea pigs are prey animals who live in packs. They instinctively try to hide the signs of illnesses , so guinea pig parents must be especially vigilant. Since sick pigs can go downhill very quickly, it’s essential to have your pet evaluated by a veterinarian in Cupertino as soon as you notice something’s wrong. Gut stasis is one of the most serious acute conditions that affect cavies. Guinea pigs need to have high-quality hay constantly moving through their bodies. When gut motility slows or stops, it is known as gut stasis.

    Bring your pig to the vet immediately if you notice that he or she hasn’t been pooping much, suffers appetite loss, or seems less active than usual. It’s helpful to clean your cavy’s house at around the same times each day. This allows you to get a sense of how much poop should be there, and you’ll be able to detect signs of illness more quickly. Additionally, be on the lookout for the following changes in your pig, which can indicate other types of ailments: Fur loss, hunched posture, diarrhea, bloody urine, labored breathing, wheezing, sneezing, and eye crusting. These symptoms can be alarming, but your vet can help your pig feel well again if treatment is administered right away.

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  • What Should I Do if My Dog Has a Hot Spot?

    Irritated patches of skin, often called hot spots, are extremely common in dogs. They can start with anything from a flea bite to exposure to an allergen, and once they get going, they can cause painful infections. See your vet in San Jose if you think your dog has a hot spot. This video will also help.

    Although some hot spots can be treated at home, it is a good idea to have your vet examine your dog before trying any over-the-counter remedies. The hot spot could be the top of an infection that needs to be treated with antibiotics, and if a flea bite was the cause, your dog could need flea medication. In the meantime, make sure your dog doesn’t lick or chew the spot as much as possible. A warm washcloth may soothe the irritated skin and reduce your dog’s discomfort.